1835, Montreal

1835, Montreal

Identifier
S.407-2006
Acquisition
Given by St. Catharine's Museum, Ontario.
Collection
Depiction
Dimension
44.5 cm (height)
33 cm (height)
18.3 cm (width)
14.5 cm (width)
Production time
Production place

Description

Silk programme on cream silk in black typography, with right and left hand sides roughly cut and frayed to form slight minimal fringe, featuring a royal crest, centre top, surrounded by the words Theatre Royal. Featuring the date, details of the benefit, and the list of characters in the plays to be performed, Gilderoy, or, The Reiver Converted, and J.B. Buckstone's melodrama Presumptive Evidence, or, Murder Will Out, 12 January 1835. The playbill notes that a Nautical Hornpipe and a Highland Fling will be performed, and that men from the 24th Regiment, from the Garrison, will perform as Soldiers, Highlanders, Countrymen and other, in the drama Gilderoy. Silk programme for an amateur Benefit performance of Gilderoy, or, the Reiver Converted, and Presumptive Evidence, featuring the men of the 24th Regiment by permission of Colonel F.S. Tidy, Theatre Royal, 12 January 1835, possibly Montreal, Canada. Silk and satin theatre playbills and programmes were produced from the 18th century onwards, to commemorate special evenings at the theatre. This silk playbill is especially interesting since it shows that this quite expensive form of theatrical ephemera was also produced in Canada in the early 19th century, even for amateur performances. This programme was produced for a Benefit Night at the Theatre Royal, Montreal, on the 12th January 1835, in aid of the Ladies' Benevolent Society, when two plays were mounted for the first time in Canada. First was the Scottish drama Gilderoy by W. Barrymore, a success at London's Victoria Theatre where it was originally produced in 1822. Buckstone's melodrama Presumptive Evidence which rounded off the evening, was first produced in London at the Adelphi Theatre in 1828. The Theatre Royal in Montreal was the first theatre building in Montreal and had opened in 1825, seating 1,500 people. The participation in Gilderoy of the men from the 24th Regiment from the Garrison, 'by the kindness of Colonel Tidy', as Soldiers, Highlanders, Countrymen and other walk-on parts, is also of interest. Colonel F.S. Tidy and the 24th Regiment of Foot came to Canada in about 1833 and were stationed first in Montreal and later in Kingston.